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Table 1 High School Girls’ and Boys’ Lacrosse Concussion Rates per 10,000 Athletic Exposures (AEs) and Gender Comparison by Injury Mechanism. The National High School Sports-Related Injury Surveillance Study, 2008–09 Through 2018–19

From: Are high school girls’ lacrosse players at increased risk of concussion because they are not allowed to wear the same helmet boys’ lacrosse players are required to wear?

 Girls’ LacrosseBoys’ LacrosseGender Comparison
n (%) Rate per 10,000 AEsn (%) Rate per 10,000 AEsRate Ratio (95% CI)a Boys’ was Referent Category
Injury MechanismCompetitionPracticeTotalCompetitionPracticeTotalCompetitionPracticeTotal
Contact with Stick or Ball188 (67.6) 6.1991 (85.8) 1.34279 (72.7) 2.8494 (19.6) 2.3650 (37.3) 0.54144 (23.5) 1.092.62 (2.05–3.37)2.46 (1.75–3.50)2.60 (2.12–3.18)
Athlete-Athlete Contact67 (24.1) 2.219 (8.5) 0.1376 (19.8) 0.77336 (70.0) 8.4372 (53.7) 0.78408 (66.4) 3.090.26 (0.20–0.34)0.17 (0.08–0.33)0.25 (0.19–0.32)
Otherb23 (8.3) 0.766 (5.7) 0.0929 (7.6) 0.2950 (10.4) 1.2512 (9.0) 0.1362 (10.1) 0.470.60 (0.36–0.98)0.68 (0.23–1.79)0.63 (0.40–0.99)
Overall278 (100.0%) 9.16106 (100.0%) 1.56384 (100.0) 3.91480 (100.0%) 12.04134 (100.0%) 1.46614 (100.0%) 4.660.76 (0.66–0.88)1.07 (0.83–1.38)0.84 (0.74–0.95)
  1. aRate ratios compared girls’ lacrosse concussion rates to boys’ lacrosse concussion rates. 95% CI not including 1.00 indicate statistically significant differences by gender. Rate ratios greater than 1.00 indicate playing girls’ lacrosse is a risk factor while rate ratios less than 1.00 indicate playing girls’ lacrosse is a protective factor compared to playing boys’ lacrosse
  2. bOther includes all other mechanism including contact with playing surface, contact with out of bounds object, unknown, etc.